Reset your Lost or Forgotten Administrator Password in Windows

Reset Windows Password

Reset your Lost or Forgotten Administrator Password in Windows

By Stephan Stemmett / Aseem Kishore
ForgotPasswordIconWhat to do if you’ve forgotten your password? It’s never fun forgetting a password, especially if you have a lot of important data on your computer, but there are tools and methods that allow you to get access to your data without ever needing to know what the original password was.

 

Note, you will have to open command prompts & type DOS commands, but if you are an Existing IT Experts client, as long as you are on the Internet, we can also reset it for you at any time remotely.

 

 

Windows 7 & Windows 8.1 Reset Password

 

There are two ways you can go about resetting a password for a user account in Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. Both methods work on both operating systems, which is really convenient. The first method uses the Windows 7 or 8.1 installation DVD and the second method involves using a third-party tool. If you don’t have your install CD/DVD, then use the second method.

 

Get your supplied installation disc for Windows 7 or 8.1 and load it into your CD/DVD drive. Restart your computer and boot up from the disc. Note that you might have to change the boot order in your BIOS before the system will boot from the disc.

 

repair computer

 

For Windows 7, the first screen will make you pick your language, keyboard, etc. Just leave those as default and click Next. For Windows 8, it will be similar. On the next screen, you’ll see a Repair your computer link at the bottom. Click on that link.

 

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5 Easy steps on how to protect your device from viruses

5 Easy steps on how to protect your device from viruses

By Sumai de Beer / Ramish Zafar
Dollarphotoclub_92017414-1024x774 Smartphones are great. They’ve managed to give us an unprecedented level of freedom and accessibility any where right at our fingerprints. What's even better is open source software, not limited to any particular device. And the market has responded accordingly, with Google’s Android have the greatest market share in smartphone Operating Systems. 

 

 

 But with such popularity, threats are natural. Just like Windows and the PC, hackers and programmers with malicious intent are busy coding software and hacks to harm the everyday smartphone user.

 

So naturally, if you don’t use your Android device safely, or within limits, you’re exposing yourself to unnecessary threats. But you’re not always at risk. Take a couple of precautions, follow a couple of steps, and your Android device will be as safe as the president.

 

Okay well maybe not. But at least you’ll end up greatly reducing the risk of installing software with malicious intent on your Android device. So take a look below, and make your device and your data more safe.

 

 1. Download An Anti-Virus

In Android, the apps you install on your device are sandboxed. This essentially means that they have limited access to your device, should they by chance decide to wreak havoc on it.

 

But installing an anti-virus is never a bad option, whatever the device may be. All the popular antivirus programs such as AVG and Avast are available for android as well.


 

               

2. Download Apps From Secure Sources Such As Play Store Or Amazon App store

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13 Ways to Speed Up Windows Boot Times

Speed Up

13 Ways to Speed Up Windows Boot Times

By Stephan Stemmett / Aseem Kishore


Speed UpEvery day millions of Windows machines are booted up and everyday millions of people sit idly by waiting for Windows to load onto the desktop.

 

The amount of time wasted can probably be measured in weeks considering how slow most Windows PCs boot up! Luckily, there are a lot of steps you can take to speed your computer’s boot time.

 

In this article, we're going to mention 14 simple ways we use to speed up PCs and hopefully you’ll find that they work for you aswell. 

 

1. Free Up Disk Space

Speed UpOne thing we do on computers running slow is clean up the disk space. There are aspects of Windows that use up quite a bit of disk space like the recycle bin, system restore, hibernation file, backed up service-pack files, WinSxS folder, temp directories, etc.

 

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On top of that, you might have a lot of data lying on your hard that you might be able to move to an external hard drive or delete, I.e. Duplicates of files, Old Irrelevant document & Backups, etc. 

 

Take the time to clean up files on your computer at least once a month.

 

2. Disable Visual Effects

 

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5 Ways To Make Your iOS Devices More Kid-Friendly And Child-Safe

5 Ways To Make Your iOS Devices More Kid-Friendly And Child-Safe

By Sumai de Beer / Sofia AK
 Kids born into the tablet generation are exposed to  more gadgets, devices and Internet tools than any  other generation before theirs.

 

 Toddlers can navigate their way in a mobile device  like a duck takes to water but they have little to no  way of knowing how to be responsible with  what they do to the contents of tablets and  smartphones.

 

 Anyone who has had lent a child his or her device,  would sometimes find apps missing, or files displaced, or even worse new purchases that were made without parental or the owner’s consent.

While it is necessary to talk to them about handling these devices more responsibly, you can always fall back on the options available in iOS devices to better handle these mishaps.

 

Here are 5 tricks on how to turn your iOS devices into kid-friendly devices (applicable for iOS 6 and above).

 

1. Block In-App Purchases

 

If you have a lot of games on your iOS devices you will need this. With your credit card linked to your Apple ID, you really don’t want to make a purchase as easy as tapping a button, especially when the person tapping it does not understand what a ‘purchase’ means.

 

To block in-app purchases:

 

Tap on Settings > General > Restrictions.

If this is your first time using the restrictions feature, tap on Enable Restrictions.

You will be asked to set a 4-digit passcode. Enter the passcode twice for confirmation.

Scroll down until you see the ‘Allowed Content’ section.

Under ‘In-App Purchases’ toggle it OFF.

Future purchases will require the use of the passcode you have just set to proceed.

 

 

2. Disable iTunes, Installing & Deleting Apps

 

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A look at the Windows 10 user experience

A look at the Windows 10 user experience

By Jeandre de Beer  /  Pc World

 

hero_carousel_2in1_mini_start_CortanaMarket_1xNow that Windows 10 is out it's time to evaluate how the OS will work for users, including how they can upgrade and what Cortana brings to the table.

 

The latest, and ostensibly last, operating system (OS) in the venerable Windows line is here: Windows 10 is out, and users can finally see what Microsoft has done to right the wrongs of the past and pave the way for the future.

 

Microsoft has said Windows 10 is the last Windows OS. The company has moved away from its traditional model of releasing a new OS every few years, and instead it will perpetually update Windows 10 the way Google constantly updates its Chrome OS.

 

Ultimately the change should be welcome news; IT administrators won't have to deal with new licensing fees or the problems inherent to migrating to a new OS after Windows 10.

 

In addition, admins can control the updates. Don't need a particular feature or want to wait and see how others shops react to it? Simply skip adding that update. And security updates are a completely separate entity, so admins can keep up with those and still pass on any feature updates they don't want.

 

If it really is the last branch on the Windows family tree, the Windows 10 user experience and features had better deliver. Take a look at how to upgrade to Windows 10, how Cortana fits in, what the Action Center does and more.

 

How can you upgrade to Windows 10?

 

Upgrading to Windows 10 is actually pretty easy, and if a user already has a qualifying version of Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 it's completely free.

 

To see if his version qualifies, the user has to turn on and run Windows Update. Once Update is on, the user must run it until his device downloads all of the latest updates.

 

Once the device is confirmed as qualified for the upgrade, Windows will install the Get Windows 10 app. As the name suggests, it allows the user to get Windows 10. He just has to launch the app, which is represented by a Windows logo located on the task bar in the notification section, and follow the instructions.

 

To start the upgrade, the user selects Reserve your Free Upgrade and his download request enters the upgrade queue. Once the user reaches the front of the line, he will receive a notification that it's his turn to install Windows 10. The user can either upgrade right away or wait until it's a convenient time.

 

Where does Cortana fit in?

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3 ways to keep sensitive files encrypted on a flash drive or external hard drive

3 ways to keep sensitive files encrypted on a flash drive or external hard drive

By Jeandre de Beer  /  Pc World

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Flash drives are easy to lose. And anything lost can fall into the wrong hands.

So if you’re carrying around sensitive information in your pocket, you need to make sure those files are encrypted. 

 

Buy an encrypted drive

 

You can buy a flash drive with built-in encryption, such as the DataTraveler Locker+ G3. When you plug the Locker+ in, it comes up as a 13MB, read-only drive.

 

But once you launch the program file on that drive and enter the password that you previously setup, another drive opens up with all the storage space you paid for. That drive, of course, is inaccessible without the password.

The software runs off the drive, and it can be used on multiple computers and operating systems.

 

But I strongly recommend against using this drive’s optional cloud backup feature. It uses Dropbox, OneDrive, or whichever cloud service you pick, which at first glance seems like a nice convenience.

But this feature uploads the files without its own encryption. That means you’re trusting your sensitive files to the encryption capabilities of Dropbox and similar services, and they aren’t all that secure. Find another way to backup these files—preferably one where you can can control the encryption.

 

Install specialized software on your drive

 

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An SSD upgrade is still the single best thing you can do for your PC

An SSD upgrade is still the single best thing you can do for your PC

By Jeandre de Beer  /  Pc World

 

01_ssd_hdd I can't tell you exactly how much your PC will speed up with an SSD. But I can tell you it will be a lot.

 

John is "considering upgrading to a SSD."

 

He wants to know "how much faster would it really be?"

 

 

 

I can't tell give you exact numbers because I don't know either your computer or what SSD you'll buy. But I can tell you this: The hard drive, with its mechanical moving parts, is almost certainly the biggest bottleneck in your PC. (If it isn't, you've got something seriously wrong–probably in the software.) Replace that hard drive with an SSD, and the bottleneck disappears.

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Three warning signs that email is malicious

Three Warning signs that email is malicious

By Jeandre de Beer  /  Pc World

 

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Email spam filtering is far better than it used to be. There was a time when nearly every scam email would land in your inbox.

Thankfully that's not the case anymore—especially if you're a Gmail user.

But no system is perfect. Every now and then a scam message will manage to slip into your inbox. But how do you know when you're looking at a scam or not?

 

Here are three basic tip-offs you can look for to figure out whether you're looking at an email with dishonest intentions. They're hardly an exhaustive list, but more often than not one of these tips will save you from getting scammed.

 

 

1. Dear customer …

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How to diagnose and fix a dead laptop keyboard

How to diagnose and fix a dead laptop keyboard

By Jeandre de Beer  /  Pc World

 

wpid-bigstock-Stethoscope-On-Laptop-Keyboard-79833199You can't write that report with a dead keyboard. A few tests can tell you how to bring it back to life.

 

The keyboard on Jan Rademan’s laptop stopped working. He’s hoping for a fix.

 

With a laptop, you can’t simply buy a new keyboard and plug it in. Replacing it is difficult (or expensive), so it’s best to find another fix before you take the big plunge.

 

If you don’t already have an external keyboard, buy one. It’s not a viable replacement for the built-in keyboard, but it will let you log into Windows with your password. It will also help you use your computer while figuring out the best solution.

 

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Making your Android device(s) safe for Kids

Making your Android device(s) safe for Kids

By Jeandre de Beer  /  Pc World
IMG_5956Android Tablets and smartphones are invaluable parenting resources, whether it’s providing new ways of educating and informing kids or simply entertaining them.

 

Learning apps, creative thinking games, and streaming video apps make your Android device an incredibly handy thing to have around (even if you’re trying to limit screen time).

 

But these powerful gadgets can just as easily point kids towards objectionable content, allow them to poke through your personal files and correspondence, or enable them to rack up significant charges on your credit or debit card. Handing a child your smartphone can be a very dangerous proposition if you’re not careful.

 

Thankfully, there are ways to keep both your kids and digital life safe when passing off an Android device, whether it’s limiting app access, setting Play Store restrictions, or pinning an app to the screen for short-term use. And third-party apps are available with even deeper customization and restriction options, particularly if you’re setting up a dedicated device for a child.

 

Don’t worry, mom and dad: you’ve got this. Here’s how.

 

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Restricted profiles (on tablets)

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